How to Add a Snapchat On-Demand Geofilter to Engage with Your Audience

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Recently, Snapchat made big news when the social media photo sharing app announced that geofilters, previously expensive and limited marketing tools, would be made widely available for all companies. We've written before about how Snapchat can be a great way to reach young and rising workers in your industry, but a Snapchat on-demand geofilter allows an extra advantage: They give you the ability to put brand filters over a particular time and place to advertise a project, place or event in a very effective way. Here are the steps to incorporating the Snapchat on-demand business geofilter:

1. Set a Timetable

This is an important step, not only for an organization but because these things are time-sensitive. For example, you may want to plan on using geofilters sooner rather than later, because Snapchat's recent release means that there's going to be a lot of interest in filters in the next few months – interest that might fade. You also want these geofilters to coincide with a marketing campaign that actually has some geographic reference – a new site, yard project or shipment.

2. Review Guidelines

Snapchat doesn't want you to create just any old filter: There is a long list of guidelines that you need to inspect first. Fortunately, most of the requirements for a business on demand geofilter will be easy to meet, and the guidelines include a lot of great advice for submissions too (include the size of the filter file, how to create a good filter, and more). As long as you stick to the obvious – no contact information on the filter, no use of unauthorized content – this should be simple.

3. Brainstorm

Take some time to decide what sort of filter to provide and how it should be used. For the LBM industry, an employee-focused filter that ties into your employee advocacy campaign is a good idea. This allows employees and even contractors to take Snapchats on site and use them to create some grassroots marketing content. It also encourages a lot of marketing synergy between supply companies and contractors that have worked together before.

4. Choose Dates and Fences

Dates and fences are two core parts of the geofilter that will define how it is used. Time refers to the dates that the filter will be applied to Snapchats within a given area: Pick a time that corresponds with important activity for the best results. Then pick a location to geofence – this is the area where your filter will automatically appear. Obviously, pick a great location for sharing photos or your work or products, according to your current schedule.

5. Pick the Right Tool

This step can be as simple or complex as you prefer. Since you probably prefer simple, it's a good idea to head over to Snapchat and use their basic template options to start making your own filter. However, if you want a more complex, fancy filter, then try using a tool like Canva instead while designing.

6. Create

Hopefully, this step doesn't cause any confusion. You have your design, your timeframe, and your tools: Put them together with help from some talented employees, and create your filter! Then upload it to Snapchat and wait for approval. As long as you have followed the guidelines, approval shouldn't be a problem – and even if you get rejected, Snapchat should tell you what was wrong so that it can quickly be corrected. The danger here is that a competitor may have chosen the same time and place as you…which is why it's important to act quickly!

7. Develop Guidelines for Use

With your filter ready to go, it's time to develop some employee and partner guidelines about how to use the geofilter for the best effect! Think about what kind of pictures you want, if you want people to include their own messages, ideal people to share the picture with, and more!

8. Make a Splash              

Consider holding an event or at least a big announcement when the timeframe for your geofilter begins. You want as many people to participate as possible!

 

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Sarah Hayes

Project Manager at 21 Handshake, a strategic marketing company, driven to grow relationship-driven businesses. A self described life long learner that thrives on detail, I love bringing these skills to the table to help others succeed.

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